A Burst of Delight and Recognition: E.E. Cummings, the Art of Noticing, and the Spirit of Rebellion – Brain Pickings


Wonderful post about author Susan Cheever’s biography of one of my favorite poets , E.E. Cummings. Four of my favorite excerpts are below :

1.

Modernism as Cummings and his mid-twentieth-century colleagues embraced it had three parts. The first was the exploration of using sounds instead of meanings to connect words to the reader’s feelings. The second was the idea of stripping away all unnecessary things to bring attention to form and structure: the formerly hidden skeleton of a work would now be exuberantly visible. The third facet of modernism was an embrace of adversity. In a world seduced by easy understanding, the modernists believed that difficulty enhanced the pleasures of reading. In a Cummings poem the reader must often pick his way toward comprehension, which comes, when it does, in a burst of delight and recognition.

 

 

2.

[The modernists] were trying to slow down the seemingly inexorable rush of the world, to force people to notice their own lives. In the twenty-first century, that rush has now reached Force Five; we are all inundated with information and given no time to wonder what it means or where it came from. Access without understanding and facts without context have become our daily diet.

 

3.

He was delighted by almost everything in life except for the institutions and formal rules that he believed sought to deaden feelings.

 

4.

Cummings despised fear, and his life was lived in defiance of all who ruled by it.

Source: A Burst of Delight and Recognition: E.E. Cummings, the Art of Noticing, and the Spirit of Rebellion – Brain Pickings

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